Aitch vows to ‘repair’ scenario after Ian Curtis mural lined with album advert

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apper Aitch has stated he’s attempting to repair the scenario “pronto” after a mural of late Pleasure Division frontman Ian Curtis was painted over with an advert for his forthcoming debut album.

The wall portray on Port Avenue in his residence metropolis of Manchester’s Northern Quarter was unveiled in 2020 by avenue artist Akse P19.

Late on Tuesday, Aitch shared a photograph on Twitter of the picture being lined over with the visuals for Shut To Dwelling, which is due out on Friday.

The 22-year-old tweeted: “It’s come to gentle that the enduring Ian Curtis mural on Port Avenue has been painted over with my album art work.

“That is the primary time I’ve heard of this, me and my crew are getting this fastened pronto. No means on earth would I wish to disrespect a neighborhood hero like Ian.”

On Wednesday morning, the wall appeared to have been returned to a clean state.

Curtis fronted influential Salford post-punk band Pleasure Division for 4 years till 1980 when he took his personal life, aged 23, on the eve of their first North American tour.

The fast response from Aitch, actual identify Harrison Armstrong, prompted a optimistic response from plenty of well-known Manchester artists.

Peter Hook, bassist in Pleasure Division and later in New Order, responded with thumbs up emoji and wrote: “Thanks @OfficialAitch nice gesture.”

Nineteen Nineties digital dance music group N-Trance and singer Rowetta from the Blissful Mondays had been additionally amongst these praising the transfer.

Higher Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham tweeted: “Respect to @OfficialAitch for this. It ought to by no means have occurred and he shouldn’t have been put on this place.

(Peter Byrne/PA)

“Ian is a real icon of our metropolis. He have to be totally restored and left in his place for time in memoriam. Because of everybody for displaying what Ian means to us.”

In Could, former members of Pleasure Division gathered for a psychological well being panel within the Homes of Parliament to mark 42 years to the day since Curtis’s demise.

Following his demise, the band continued below the brand new identify of New Order, eschewing their darkish post-punk sound in favour of synths and digital beats, and turning into a robust industrial drive.


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